World Library  


Add to Book Shelf
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Book

Memories and Portraits

By Stevenson, Robert Louis

Click here to view

Book Id: WPLBN0000660470
Format Type: PDF eBook
File Size: 391.38 KB.
Reproduction Date: 2005

Title: Memories and Portraits  
Author: Stevenson, Robert Louis
Volume:
Language: English
Subject: Fiction, Literature, Literature & drama
Collections: Penn State University's Electronic Classics Series Collection
Historic
Publication Date:
Publisher: Penn State University's Electronic Classics

Citation

APA MLA Chicago

Stevenson, R. L. (n.d.). Memories and Portraits. Retrieved from http://www.netlibrary.net/


Excerpt
Excerpt: Chapter 1. The Foreigner At Home. ?This is no my ain house; I ken by the biggin? o?t.? Two recent books* one by Mr. Grant White on England, one on France by the diabolically clever Mr. Hillebrand, may well have set people thinking on the divisions of races and nations. Such thoughts should arise with particular congruity and force to inhabitants of that United Kingdom, peopled from so many different stocks, babbling so many different dialects, and offering in its extent such singular contrasts, from the busiest over-population to the unkindliest desert, from the Black Country to the Moor of Rannoch. It is not only when we cross the seas that we go abroad; there are foreign parts of England; and the race that has conquered so wide an empire has not yet managed to assimilate the islands whence she sprang. Ireland, Wales, and the Scottish mountains still cling, in part, to their old Gaelic speech. It was but the other day that English triumphed in Cornwall, and they still show in Mousehole, on St. Michael?s Bay, the house of the last Cornish-speaking woman. English itself, which will now frank the traveller through the most of North America, through the greater South Sea Islands, in India, along much of the coast of Africa, and in the ports of China and Japan, is still to be heard, in its home country, in half a hundred varying stages of transition. You may go all over the States, and -- setting aside the actual intrusion and influence of foreigners, negro, French, or Chinese -- you shall scarce meet with so marked a difference of accent as in the forty miles between Edinburgh and Glasgow, or of dialect as in the hundred miles between Edinburgh and Aberdeen. Book English has gone round the world, but at home we still preserve the racy idioms of our fathers, and every county, in some parts every dale, has its own quality of speech, vocal or verbal. In like manner, local custom and prejudice, even local religion and local law, linger on into the latter end of the nineteenth century -- imperia in imperio, foreign things at home.

Table of Contents
Contents CHAPTER I: THE FOREIGNER AT HOME ..................................................................................... 5 CHAPTER II: SOME COLLEGE MEMORIES................................................................................ 14 CHAPTER III: OLD MORTALITY .................................................................................................. 20 CHAPTER IV: A COLLEGE MAGAZINE ...................................................................................... 28 CHAPTER V: AN OLD SCOTCH GARDENER ............................................................................. 36 CHAPTER VI: PASTORAL .............................................................................................................. 41 CHAPTER VII: THE MANSE .......................................................................................................... 48 CHAPTER VIII: MEMOIRS OF AN ISLET .................................................................................... 53 CHAPTER IX: THOMAS STEVENSON ? CIVIL ENGINEER...................................................... 58 CHAPTER X: TALK AND TALKERS ............................................................................................. 63 CHAPTER XI: TALK AND TALKERS ............................................................................................ 74 CHAPTER XII: THE CHARACTER OF DOGS .............................................................................. 83 CHAPTER XIII: A PENNY PLAIN AND TWOPENCE COLOURED ........................................... 92 CHAPTER XIV: A GOSSIP ON A NOVEL OF DUMAS?S ............................................................ 98 CHAPTER XV: A GOSSIP ON ROMANCE ................................................................................. 106 CHAPTER XVI: A HUMBLE REMONSTRANCE ........................................................................117

 

Click To View

Additional Books


  • War Song (by )
  • Song of a Train (by )
  • A Runnable Stag (by )
  • Aubade (by )
  • It Is Not Beauty I Demand (by )
  • The Face on the Barroom Floor (by )
  • Delia (by )
  • Delia (by )
  • Delia (by )
  • Love Is a Sickness (by )
  • The Pleasure Boat (by )
  • The Sheep and the Bramble-Bush (by )
Scroll Left
Scroll Right

 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.