Warm water immersion foot

Immersion foot
Classification and external resources
10 9 DiseasesDB 31219

Immersion foot syndromes include:[1]:26–7

Causes

Trench foot

Main article: Trench foot

Trench foot is a medical condition caused by prolonged exposure of the feet to damp, unsanitary, and cold conditions. The use of the word trench in the name of this condition is a reference to trench warfare, mainly associated with World War I. Affected feet may become numb, affected by erythrosis (turning red) or cyanosis (turning blue) as a result of poor vascular supply, and feet may begin to have a decaying odour due to the possibility of the early stages of necrosis setting in. As the condition worsens, feet may also begin to swell. Advanced trench foot often involves blisters and open sores, which lead to fungal infections; this is sometimes called tropical ulcer (jungle rot).

If left untreated, trench foot usually results in gangrene, which can cause the need for amputation. If trench foot is treated properly, complete recovery is normal, though it is marked by severe short-term pain when feeling returns. As with other cold-related injuries, trench foot leaves sufferers more susceptible to it in the future.

Tropical immersion foot

Tropical immersion foot (also known as "Paddy foot",[1] and "Paddy-field foot"[2]) is a skin condition of the feet seen after continuous immersion of the feet in water or mud of temperature above 22 degrees Celsius for two to ten days.[1]:27

Warm water immersion foot

Warm water immersion foot is a skin condition of the feet that results after exposure to warm, wet conditions for 48 hours or more, and is characterized by maceration ("pruning"), blanching, and wrinkling of the soles and sides of the feet.[1]:27[2]

References

de:Immersionsfuß

he:רגל חפירות nl:Loopgravenvoeten no:Skyttergravsfot sv:Skyttegravsfot

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