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Treaty of Luneville

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Title: Treaty of Luneville  
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Subject: Bas-Rhin, Austrian Empire, Jan Henryk Dąbrowski, Polish Legions (Napoleonic period)
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Treaty of Luneville

The Treaty of Lunéville was signed on 9 February 1801 between the French Republic and the Holy Roman Emperor Francis II, negotiating both on behalf of his own domains and of the Holy Roman Empire. Joseph Bonaparte signed for France, and Count Ludwig von Cobenzl, the Austrian foreign minister, signed for the Emperor.

The Austrian army had been defeated by Napoleon at the Battle of Marengo on 14 June 1800 and then by Moreau at the Battle of Hohenlinden on 3 December. Forced to sue for peace, they signed another in a series of treaties. This treaty (along with the Treaty of Amiens) marked the end of the Second Coalition; after this treaty, Great Britain was the sole nation still at war with France (but only for another year).

Treaty terms

The Treaty of Lunéville declared that "there shall be, henceforth and forever, peace, amity, and good understanding" among the parties. The treaty required Austria to enforce the conditions of the earlier Treaty of Campo Formio (concluded on 17 October 1797). Certain Austrian holdings in Germany were relinquished; French control was extended to the left bank of the Rhine, "in complete sovereignty", but they renounced any claim to territories east of the Rhine. Contested boundaries in Italy were set, and the Grand Duchy of Tuscany was awarded to the French, but the duke was compensated with lands in Germany. The two parties agreed to respect the independence of the Batavian, Cisalpine, Helvetic and Ligurian republics. In Northern Italy, the two semi-independent bishoprics of Trento and Brixen were secularized and annexed to Austria.

The Austrians re-entered the Napoleonic Wars in 1805.

See also

External links

  • Text of the treaty (in French)
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