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Scirians

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Scirians

The Scirii (also Sciri, Scirians, Skirii, Skiri or Skirians) were an East Germanic tribe[1] of Eastern Europe, attested in historical works between the 2nd century BC and 5th century AD. The etymology of their name is unclear. Attempts that are based on Germanic yielded clean- or pure-bloods as opposed to the neighbouring tribe of Bastarnae mixed-bloods (cf. bastard).[2]

The Scirii are believed to have first lived within the territory of modern Poland. They migrated southwards apparently around 200 BC (some secondary works give a more precise date of 230 BC), along with the Bastarnae. The Protogenes Inscription (3rd century BC) mention the Sciri,[3][need quotation to verify] when they tried unsuccessfully to capture the Greek city Olbia, northwest of the Black Sea. After a peace treaty with the Roman Empire they are recorded as living east of the Bastarnae, near the Black Sea.

For the next six centuries historical references to the Scirii are sporadic, but sufficient to suggest continuity.

In the 4th century AD, some of the Scirii lived in the Carpathians, where they were defeated by the Huns. During the height of the Hunnic empire under the Huns' leader Attila, the Scirians allied themselves with Attila and provided potent infantry for him. After the Hunnic empire disintegrated, part of the Scirii joined with the Western Goths and the Eastern Goths, while others became foederati in the Roman empire. Odoacer, the first King of Italy, was half-Scirian.

See also

Ancient Germanic culture portal

References

Notes

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