Russian ruble

Russian ruble
Российский рубль (Russian)[1]
5,000 rubles (2006) Coins
ISO 4217 code RUB
Central bank Bank of Russia
 Website .ru.cbrwww
User(s)  Russia
Abkhazia
South Ossetia
 Luhansk People's Republic
 Donetsk People's Republic
Inflation 15.6%, July 2015
 Source [2]
 Method CPI
Subunit
1100 kopeyka (копейка[3])
Symbol ₽ (RUB),   руб (colloquially)
 kopeyka (копейка[4]) коп. / к.
Plural The language(s) of this currency belong(s) to the Slavic languages. There is more than one way to construct plural forms.
Coins
 Freq. used 10, 50 kopeks, 1, 2, 5, 10, 25[5] rubles
 Rarely used 1, 5 kopeks
Banknotes
 Freq. used 50, 100, 500, 1000, 5000 rubles
 Rarely used 5, 10 rubles
Printer Goznak
 Website .ru.goznakwww
Mint Moscow Mint and Saint Petersburg Mint

The ruble or rouble (Russian: рубль, rublʹ, plural рубли́, rubli; see note on English spelling) (sign: ; code: RUB) is the currency of Russia and the two partially recognized republics of Abkhazia and South Ossetia. The ruble is also used in the unrecognised quasi-states of the Donetsk People's Republic and the Luhansk People's Republic. Originally, the ruble was the currency of the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union before its dissolution. Belarus and Transnistria use currencies with the same name. The ruble is subdivided into 100 kopeks (sometimes written as kopecks or copecks; Russian: копе́йка, kopeyka; plural: копе́йки, kopeyki). The ISO 4217 code is RUB or 643; the former code, RUR or 810, refers to the Russian ruble before the 1998 redenomination (1 RUB = 1,000 RUR).

Ruble sign PT Sans

The Russian ruble is the world's first decimal currency, being decimalised in 1704 when the ruble became legally equal to 100 kopeks.[6]

Contents

  • History 1
    • Etymology 1.1
    • Names of different denominations 1.2
    • Currency symbol 1.3
  • First ruble (to 31 December 1921) 2
    • Coins 2.1
      • Constantine ruble 2.1.1
    • Banknotes 2.2
      • Imperial issues 2.2.1
      • Provisional Government issues 2.2.2
  • Post-Soviet ruble (1993–1998) 3
    • Coins 3.1
    • Banknotes 3.2
  • New ruble (1 January 1998–present) 4
    • Coins 4.1
    • Banknotes 4.2
      • Commemorative banknotes 4.2.1
      • Printing 4.2.2
      • Controversy 4.2.3
    • Exchange rates 4.3
      • Against various currencies 4.3.1
  • References 5
  • External links 6

History

Etymology

According to the most popular version, the word "ruble" is derived from the Russian verb руби́ть (rubit'), meaning "to chop", to cut, to hack, as ruble was considered as a cutout piece ( a quarter ) of a silver Gryvna. A popular theory deriving word ruble from rupee is probably not correct.[7]

In 1704, Peter the Great reformed the old Russian monetary system, ordering the minting of a 28-gramme silver ruble coin equivalent to 100 new copper kopek coins.

Names of different denominations

In the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries, several coins had individual names:

  • 14 kopek – polushka
  • 12 kopek – denga or dénezhka
  • 2 kopek – semishnik (mostly disappeared by 20th century), dvúshka (20th century) or grosh