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Mediterranean Games

 

Mediterranean Games

Mediterranean Games
Flag of the games
Alexandria Mediterranean Games 1951
First event 1951, in Alexandria, Egypt
Occur every four years
Last event 2013, Mersin, Turkey
Purpose Sports for the Mediterranean
President Mr. Amar Addadi (Algeria)
Website International Mediterranean Games Committee

The Mediterranean Games are a multi-sport games held every four years, between nations around or very close to the Mediterranean Sea, where Europe, Africa and Asia meet. The games are under the auspices of the International Committee of Mediterranean Games (CIJM).

Contents

  • History 1
  • Description 2
  • Participating countries 3
  • Flag 4
  • Host cities 5
  • Mediterranean Beach Games 6
  • All-time medal table 1951–2013 7
  • Competitions 8
  • See also 9
  • References 10
  • External links 11

History

The idea was proposed at the 1948 Summer Olympics by Muhammed Taher Pasha, chairman of the Egyptian Olympic Committee and vice-president of the International Olympic Committee (I.O.C.), assisted by the Greek member of the I.O.C. Ioannis Ketseas.[1] In 1949 an unofficial event was held in Istanbul, Turkey[2] but the first official Mediterranean Games were held in Egypt in 1951.

The Games were inaugurated on October 1951, in Alexandria, Egypt, in honour of Muhammed Taher Pasha, with contests being held in 13 sports along with the participation of 734 athletes from 10 countries. In 1955, in Barcelona, during the II Games, the set up was decided of a Supervisory and Controlling Body for the Games, a kind of Executive Committee. The decisions were finally materialized on June 16, 1961, and the said Body was named, upon a Greek notion, ICMG (International Committee for the Mediterranean Games).

The first 11 games took place always one year preceding the Summer Olympic Games. However, from 1993 on, they were held the year following the Olympic games. This transition meant that the only time the Mediterranean Games were not held four years after the previous Games was in 1993, when Languedoc-Roussillon in France hosted the Games just two years after Athens.

Description

The Mediterranean Games, in terms of the preparation and composition of the National Delegation, are held under the auspices of the International Olympic Committee and the Hellenic Olympic Committee (HOC). However, their establishment too must be credited to the HOC, for it held a leading part in their being founded despite all difficulties.

Athens is the permanent seat of the ICMG (regardless of who the President might be) and the Committee’s General Secretary is Greek. This comes as a further tribute to Greece, highlighting its leading role with regard to the function and strengthening of the institution. Except that Greece bailed out of its 2013 Mediterranean Games commitment when the two cities of Volos and Larissa were supposed to host the 2013 edition of the Games. But because of Greece's financial troubles, they had to give that up and the 2013 honors went instead to Turkey, with the city of Mersin rescuing the 2013 edition of the Games instead.

The logo of the games, also referred to as the "Mediterranean Olympics", is composed of three white rings symbolically representing Africa, Asia, and Europe — the three continents that border the Mediterranean Sea. This logo has been used since the Split games in 1979, for which it was devised and afterwards accepted for the whole Games. During the closing ceremony, the flag of the games is transferred to the country of the city chosen for the organisation of the next Mediterranean Games.

Participating countries

Participating countries

At present, 24 countries participate in the games:[3]

Kosovo was accepted as a member of the International Committee of Mediterranean Games in October 2015 and is expected to participate for the first time in the 2017 Mediterranean Games in Spain.[4]

Of all the National Olympic Committees within the Olympic Movement bordering the Mediterranean Sea only the Israeli is not permitted to participate.

Allen Guttman in The Games Must Go On argued that Israel's exclusion is both


  • International Mediterranean Games Committee
  • websitegbrathleticsMediterranean Games Athletic results at
  • Dubrovnik, Mostar and Kotor joint application for 2021 Games, Croatian newspapers Slobodna Dalmacija
  • Dubrovnik, Mostar and Kotor joint application for 2021 Games, Bosnian-Herzegovian newspapers
  • Mersin XVII Mediterranean Games

External links

  1. ^ "History of the Mediterranean Games". International Committee of Mediterranean Games. CIJM. Retrieved 21 June 2015. 
  2. ^ "Mediterranean Games". gbrathletics.com. Retrieved 21 December 2012. The Mediterranean Games were first held in 1951, although an unofficial Games was previously held in 1949. 
  3. ^ Participating countries
  4. ^ [2].
  5. ^ The games must go on: Avery Brundage and the Olympic movement, Allen Guttmann, page 225.
  6. ^ a b "Mediterranean Games History". Mediterranean Games Site. 2008. Retrieved 2008-10-02. 
  7. ^ http://www.cijm.org.gr/images/stories/pdf/JM2001.pdf
  8. ^ 1st Mediterranean Beach Games
  9. ^ Official Website of Pescara 2015 Mediterranean Beach Games
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z CIJM: Medal Tables per Country
  11. ^ http://www.cijm.org.gr/images/stories/pdf/Tableau_des_medailles_par_pays_en.pdf
  12. ^ http://www.cijm.org.gr/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=126&Itemid=97&lang=en

References

See also

Sport Years
Archery since 1971
Athletics since 1951
Badminton since 2013
Basketball since 1951
Beach volleyball since 2005
Bocce since 1997
Boxing since 1951
Canoeing since 1979
Cycling since 1955
Diving since 1951
Equestrian since 1955
Sport Years
Fencing since 1951
Field hockey since 1955
Football since 1951
Golf since 1983
Gymnastics since 1951
Handball since 1967
Judo since 1971
Karate since 1993
Roller hockey since 1955
Rowing since 1951
Rugby union since 1955
Sport Years
Sailing since 1955
Shooting since 1951
Swimming since 1951
Table tennis since 1971
Taekwondo since 2013
Tennis since 1963
Volleyball since 1959
Water polo since 1951
Waterskiing since 2009
Weightlifting since 1951
Wrestling since 1951

33 sports were presented in the Mediterranean Games history.

Competitions

Rank Team Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Italy 820 686 647 2153[10]
2 France 604 549 492 1645[10]
3 Turkey 310 214 239 763[10]
4 Spain 295 413 500 1208[10]
5 Yugoslavia* 199 177 182 558[10][11]
6 Greece 180 233 318 731[10]
7 Egypt 124 183 215 522[10]
8 Tunisia 77 80 134 291[10]
9 Algeria 65 55 108 227[10]
10 Morocco 59 74 94 227[10]
11 Croatia 41 58 66 165[10]
12 Slovenia 40 39 57 136[10]
13 Serbia* 29 33 38 100[10]
14 Syria 26 37 73 136[10]
15 United Arab Republic 23 21 30 74[10]
16 Lebanon 13 22 44 79[10]
17 Cyprus 10 14 12 36[10]
18 Albania 8 17 18 43[10]
19 Bosnia and Herzegovina 3 6 16 25[10]
20 Montenegro 3 3 6 12[10]
21 Libya 2 1 12 15[10]
22 Malta 2 4 3 9[10]
23 San Marino 1 9 5 15[10]
24 Macedonia 0 1 4 5[10]
25 Monaco 0 1 1 2[10]
26 Andorra 0 0 0 0[10]
Total 2686 2686 3023 8395

All-time medal table 1951–2013

Pescara (Italy) was awarded the rights to host the first edition of the Mediterranean Beach Games from 28 August to 6 September.[9] The sports included in the program of the 1st Mediterranean Beach Games are the following: Aquathlon, Beach Handball, Beach Soccer, Beach Tennis, Beach Volley, Beach Wrestling, Finswimming, Canoe Ocean Racing, Open Water Swimming, Rowing Beach Sprint, Water Ski.

[8] The International Mediterranean Games Committee held a meeting on October 20, 2012 in

Mediterranean Beach Games

No Year Host Nations Competitors Sports Events Top Country On Medal Table
Men Women Total
I 1951 Alexandria 10 734 --- 734 14 91  Italy
II 1955 Barcelona 10 1135 --- 1135 20 102  France
III 1959 Beirut 11 792 --- 792 17 106  France
IV 1963 Naples 13 1057 --- 1057 17 93  Italy
V 1967 Tunis 12 1211 38 1249 14 93  Italy
VI 1971 İzmir 14 1235 127 1362 18 137  Italy
VII 1975 Algiers 15 2095 349 2444 19 160  Italy
VIII 1979 Split 14 2009 399 2408 26 192  Yugoslavia
IX 1983 Casablanca 16 1845 335 2180 20 162  Italy
X 1987 Latakia 18 1845 335 2180 19 162  Italy
XI 1991 Athens 18 2176 586 2762 24 217  Italy
XII 1993 Languedoc-Roussillon 20 1994 604 2598 24 217  France
XIII 1997 Bari 21 2195 804 2999 27 234  Italy
XIV 2001 Tunis 23[7] 2002 1039 3041 23 230  France
XV 2005 Almería 21 2134 1080 3214 27 258  Italy
XVI 2009 Pescara 23 2183 1185 3368 28 244  Italy
XVII 2013 Mersin 24 2994 27 264  Italy
XVIII 2017 Tarragona Future Event
XIX 2021 Oran Future Event
Cities that have hosted the Games

No inland city has ever hosted the games. All but one of the host cities to date have been situated on the Mediterranean coast. (Casablanca is located on the Atlantic coast.)

Host cities

The symbol of the Mediterranean Games consists of three rings representing Asia, Africa and Europe, the three continents involved in this competition.[6] The rings dissolve in a wavy line in their lower part, as if they were immersed in the Mediterranean Sea. During the closing ceremony, the flag is transferred to the country of the city chosen to host the next Mediterranean Games.[6]

Flag

The Hellenic Olympic Committee has suggested that nine more countries that do not satisfy geographic criteria to be allowed to participate, such as Bulgaria, Portugal and some Arab countries.

There are countries not bordering the Mediterranean Sea which nonetheless participate: Andorra, San Marino, Serbia and Macedonia.

[5]

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