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Maltodextrin

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Title: Maltodextrin  
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Subject: Starch, Equal (sweetener), Splenda, Modified starch, Maltotriose
Collection: Food Additives, Oligosaccharides, Starch
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Maltodextrin

Maltodextrin
Identifiers
 Y
ChemSpider  N
PubChem
UNII  Y
Properties
C6nH(10n+2)O(5n+1)
Molar mass variable
Appearance white powder
Freely soluble or readily dispersible in water[1]
Solubility slightly soluble to insoluble in anhydrous alcohol[1]
Hazards
NFPA 704
1
1
0
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
 N  (: Y/N?)

Maltodextrin is a polysaccharide that is used as a food additive. It is produced from starch by partial hydrolysis and is usually found as a white hygroscopic spray-dried powder.[1] Maltodextrin is easily digestible, being absorbed as rapidly as glucose, and might be either moderately sweet or almost flavorless. It is commonly used for the production of sodas and candy. It can also be found as an ingredient in a variety of other processed foods.

Contents

  • Structure 1
  • Production 2
  • Uses 3
  • As food ingredient 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Structure

Maltodextrin consists of D-glucose units connected in chains of variable length. The glucose units are primarily linked with α(1→4) glycosidic bonds. Maltodextrin is typically composed of a mixture of chains that vary from three to seventeen glucose units long.[2]

Maltodextrins are classified by DE (dextrose equivalent) and have a DE between 3 to 20. The higher the DE value, the shorter the glucose chains, the higher the sweetness, the higher the solubility and the lower heat resistance. Above DE 20, the European Union's CN code calls it glucose syrup, at DE 10 or lower the customs CN code nomenclature classifies maltodextrins as dextrins.

Production

Maltodextrin can be enzymatically derived from any starch. In the US, this starch is usually corn; in Europe, it is commonly wheat. Some individuals suffering from gluten intolerance may be concerned by the presence of wheat derived maltodextrin but it is highly unlikely to contain significant (20 mg/kg or 20ppm) amounts of gluten. If wheat is used to make maltodextrin, it does not need to appear on the label. Maltodextrin derived from cereals containing gluten is exempt from labeling, as set out in Annex II of EC Directive 2000/13.[3]

Uses

Maltodextrin is sometimes used in beer brewing to increase the specific gravity of the final product.[4] This improves the mouthfeel of the beer, increases head retention and reduces the dryness of the drink. Maltodextrin is not fermented by yeast, so it does not increase the alcohol content of the brew. It is also used in snacks such as some potato chips and jerkies. It is used in "light" peanut butter to reduce the fat content but keep the texture. Maltodextrin is also sometimes taken as a supplement in powder form by bodybuilders and other athletes, as it is a quickly digested carbohydrate that supplies the body with enough energy to engage in protein synthesis post-workout.

As food ingredient

Maltodextrin is used as an inexpensive additive to thicken food products such as infant formula. It is also used as a filler in sugar substitutes and other products.[5]

Maltodextrin has a glycemic index ranging from 85 to 105.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c U.S. Pharmacopeia summary of maltodextrin
  2. ^ "Other Caloric Sweeteners", Sugar Association website
  3. ^ Annex II, The approximation of the laws of the Member States relating to the labelling, presentation and advertising of foodstuffs, Directive No. 2000/13/EC of 20 March 2000. Retrieved on 30 March 2015.
  4. ^ "How to Brew" at Black Rock, a beer brewing supplier in New Zealand
  5. ^ http://www.wisegeek.org/what-is-maltodextrin.htm

External links

  • Maltodextrin entry on Grokfood.com
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