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Lerner and Loewe

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Title: Lerner and Loewe  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Paint Your Wagon (film), Camelot (musical), My Fair Lady, Alan Jay Lerner, What's Up? (musical)
Collection: American Musical Duos, American Musical Theatre Composers, Songwriting Teams
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Lerner and Loewe

Lerner and Loewe were the team of lyricist and librettist Alan Jay Lerner and composer Frederick Loewe, known primarily for the music and lyrics of some of Broadway's most successful musical shows, including My Fair Lady, Camelot, and Brigadoon.

Contents

  • Partnership 1
  • Other 2
  • Theatre works 3
  • Films and film adaptations 4
  • Notes 5
  • References 6

Partnership

Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe, more commonly known as Fritz, met in 1942 at the Lambs Club in New York City[1] where, according to Loewe, he mistakenly took a wrong turn to the men's room and walked past Lerner's table. Having recognized him, he asked if Lerner wrote lyrics and Lerner confirmed he did.

Lerner claimed to be the more dominant member of the partnership, which is supported by interviews with their close friends, saying that he would throw out the first two melodies that Loewe would write to any song even if they were both perfect. He said he always knew, with a little pushing, Loewe was capable of greater work. Loewe also worked perfectly with Lerner, who would agonize for weeks over a lyric. Unlike other collaborators Lerner would work with, Loewe was the most understanding of the time Lerner needed for his lyrics and would never pressure him to complete the work.

Their last collaboration came with the 1974 musical film The Little Prince, which received mixed reviews but was lauded as one of the team's most cerebral scores.

Regardless of their professional relationship, Lerner and Loewe were close friends and remained so until the end of their lives. Their final public appearance was in December 1985, when they received a Kennedy Center Honor, six months before Lerner's death.

Lerner said this of Loewe:

"There will never be another Fritz...Writing will never again be as much fun. A collaboration as intense as ours inescapably had to be complex. But I loved him more than I understood or misunderstood him and I know he loved me more than he understood or misunderstood me."[2]

Other

On October 21, 1956, Lerner and Loewe appeared together as contestants on the panel quiz show What's My Line?.

Theatre works

Films and film adaptations

Notes

  1. ^ http://www.holeintheweb.com/drp/bhd/LernerLoewe.htm
  2. ^ Lerner, Alan Jay."Chapter"Camelot"The Street Where I Live, Da Capo Press, 1994, ISBN 0-306-80602-9, p. 247

References

  • Lees, Gene (2005, originally published 1991). The Musical Worlds of Lerner and Loewe. University of Nebraska Press (bisonbooks.com), ISBN 0-8032-8040-8
  • Green, Benny, Editor (1987). A Hymn to Him : The Lyrics of Alan Jay Lerner. Hal Leonard Corporation. ISBN 0-87910-109-1
  • Lerner, Alan Jay (1985). The Street Where I Live. Da Capo Press. ISBN 0-306-80602-9
  • Green, Benny. "Frederick Loewe, a prince of musical comedy", The Guardian, February 16, 1988, p. 33
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