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Job fair

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Title: Job fair  
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Subject: Job hunting, Employment, Job interview, Job fraud, Job sharing
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Job fair

A job fair in New York City, March 2009

A job fair, also referred commonly as a career fair or career expo, is a fair or exposition for employers, recruiters, and schools to meet with prospective job seekers. A job fair is an event in which employers, recruiters, and schools give information to potential employees. Job seekers attend these while trying to make a good impression to potential coworkers by speaking face-to-face with one another, filling out résumés, and asking questions in attempt to get a good feel on the work needed. Likewise, online job fairs are held, giving job seekers another way to get in contact with probable employers using the internet.

In-person

In colleges, job fairs are commonly used for entry-level job recruitment. Job seekers use this opportunity to meet with them and attempt to stand out from other people and get an overview of what it’s like to work for a company or a sector that seem interesting to them.[1]

Career expositions usually include company or organization tables or booths where resumes can be collected and business cards can be exchanged. Often sponsored by career centers, job fairs provide a convenient location for students to meet employers and perform first interviews. This is also an opportunity for companies to meet with students and talk to them about their expectations from them as students and answer their potential questions such as the degree or work experience needed.[2]

Online job fairs

Online job fairs offer many of the same conveniences of regular career fairs. An online job fair uses a virtual platform which allows employers to discuss with potential new nominees for the job they’re offering. This is a way of interacting with them virtually and practical to get to know who they are. A virtual career fair include many services such as video, live chats, downloadable material and many more to make it the more helpful both for the recruiter and the job seeker. After having applied online to positions, many more people are also trying their luck with in-person job fairs.[3]

References

  1. ^ JACQUELYN SMITH . 11 tips to get something useful out of a job fair . http://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-get-the-most-out-of-job-fairs-2014-3 (accessed October 2014).
  2. ^ NorthWestern University Division of Student Affairs. How to work a career fair . http://www.northwestern.edu/careers/students/employment-skills/how-to-work-a-career-fair.html (accessed October 2014).
  3. ^ "Job fair draws most seniors in event's history".. CNN. Retrieved 2012-07-25. http://edition.cnn.com/2009/US/04/23/wtja.economy.jobs/index.html http://www.thejobfairs.co.uk
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