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Information and communication technologies in education

 

Information and communication technologies in education

For information technology in general, see Information technology.

Information and communication technologies in education refers to teaching and learning the subject matter that enables understanding the functions and effective use of information and communication technologies (ICTs). As of 2004, a review and contexualization of the literature on teaching ICT as a subject implied that there was limited, systematically-derived, quality information.[1]

Educating educators about technology

In order to use technology effectively, educators need to be trained in using technology and they need to develop a good understanding of it. Technology is used to enhance learning, therefore it is important for educators to be comfortable using it to ensure that students get the full advantages of educational technology.[2] Teaching with technology is different than teaching within a typical classroom. Teachers must be trained in how to plan, create, and deliver instruction within a technological setting. It requires a different pedagogical approach. Teachers must find a way to assess students on what they take away from a class and meaningful, known knowledge, especially within an eLearning setting.[3] Teacher, Researcher and Inventor do play a critical role in country building by intellectual power and thinking applied in shaping up the future of the young generation. Teaching with technology becomes most effective, technology does not mean that using interactive electronic boards and LCD power point presentation. It also means the model like friccohesity and tentropy or the equipment such as oscosurvismeter or the specific design to be taught to the students must be before the students then they may pick up quickly. Teachers have promote creative approach of the students, for example, current invention of survismeter convey the same meaning of creating new knowledge in society that helps learning and teaching process.

Technology training appears to focus mainly on technology knowledge and skills while overlooking the relationships between technology, pedagogy, and content.[2] As a result, teachers learn about “cool” stuff, but they still have difficulty applying it for their students’ learning. Teacher candidates need opportunities to practice effective technology integration strategies in supportive contexts during technology courses, technology-integrated methods courses, and field experiences. Experienced teachers also need opportunities to learn about new technologies and ways to integrate them effectively in their classroom. Teacher, Researcher and Inventor do play a critical role in country building by intellectual power and thinking applied in shaping up the future of the young generation. Teaching with technology becomes most effective, technology does not mean that using interactive electronic boards and LCD power point presentation. It also means the model like friccohesity and tentropy or the equipment such as oscosurvismeter or the specific design to be taught to the students must be before the students then they may pick up quickly. Teachers have promote creative approach of the students, for example, current invention of survismeter convey the same meaning of creating new knowledge in society that helps learning and teaching process. Teacher education programs can facilitate improvements not only in students’ technology skills but also in their beliefs and intentions regarding integrating technology into instruction. Technology training directly affects preservice teachers’ self-efficacy and value beliefs, which in turn influence their student-centered technology use.[4]

References

External links

  • Digital Media and Learning. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. [1]
  • ICT in Education Programme, UNESCO Bangkok [2]
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