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Federal tax revenue by state

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Title: Federal tax revenue by state  
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Federal tax revenue by state

This is a table of the total federal tax revenue by state collected by the U.S. Internal Revenue Service.

Gross collections indicates the total federal tax revenue collected by the IRS from each U.S. state, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The figure includes all individual and corporate income taxes, payroll taxes, estate taxes, gift taxes, and excise taxes. This table does not include federal tax revenue data from U.S. Armed Forces personnel stationed overseas, U.S. territories other than Puerto Rico, and U.S. citizens and legal residents living abroad, even though they may be required to pay federal taxes.

Contents

  • Fiscal Year 2012 1
  • Fiscal Year 2011 2
  • Maps and graphs 3
  • See also 4
  • Notes 5
  • References 6

Fiscal Year 2012

This table lists the tax revenue collected from each state, plus the District of Columbia and the territory of Puerto Rico by the IRS in fiscal year 2012, which ran from October 1, 2011, through September 30, 2012. The gross collections total only reflects the revenue collected from the categories listed in the table, and not the entire revenue collected by the IRS. Per capita values are based on population estimates from the Census Bureau for July 1, 2012.[1]

Rank State Gross collections[2] Revenue per capita (est.) Ratio to GSP[3]
1 California $292,563,574,000 $7,690.66 14.6%
2 Texas $219,459,878,000 $8,421.59 15.7%
3 New York $201,167,954,000 $10,279.27 16.7%
4 Illinois $124,431,227,000 $9,664.37 17.9%
5 Florida $122,249,635,000 $6,328.42 15.7%
6 New Jersey $111,377,490,000 $12,564.31 21.9%
7 Ohio $111,094,276,000 $9,623.36 21.8%
8 Pennsylvania $108,961,515,000 $8,536.94 18.1%
9 Massachusetts $79,826,976,000 $12,011.02 19.8%
10 Minnesota $78,685,402,000 $14,627.88 26.7%
11 Georgia $65,498,308,000 $6,602.69 15.1%
12 Virginia $64,297,400,000 $7,854.68 14.4%
13 North Carolina $61,600,064,000 $6,316.61 13.5%
14 Michigan $59,210,158,000 $5,990.89 14.8%
15 Washington $52,443,862,000 $7,603.85 14.0%
16 Indiana $51,238,512,000 $7,837.83 17.2%
17 Missouri $48,413,247,000 $8,039.41 18.7%
18 Maryland $48,107,002,000 $8,175.12 15.1%
19 Connecticut $47,262,702,000 $13,163.83 20.6%
20 Tennessee $47,010,303,000 $7,281.37 17.0%
21 Wisconsin $41,498,033,000 $7,246.80 15.9%
22 Colorado $41,252,701,000 $7,952.20 15.1%
23 Arizona $34,850,436,000 $5,318.03 13.1%
24 Louisiana $34,811,072,000 $7,564.51 14.3%
25 Oklahoma $27,087,264,000 $7,100.54 16.8%
26 Arkansas $25,299,832,000 $8,578.74 23.1%
27 Kentucky $25,085,813,000 $5,726.81 14.5%
28 Oregon $22,716,602,000 $5,825.74 11.4%
29 Kansas $21,904,615,000 $7,590.21 15.8%
30 Delaware $21,835,412,000 $23,809.40 33.1%
31 Alabama $20,882,949,000 $4,330.74 11.4%
District of Columbia[4] $20,747,652,000 $32,811.79 18.9%
32 Nebraska $19,795,254,000 $10,668.28 19.9%
33 Iowa $18,753,596,000 $6,100.35 12.3%
34 South Carolina $18,557,166,000 $3,928.50 10.5%
35 Utah $15,642,129,000 $5,478.30 12.0%
36 Nevada $13,727,425,000 $4,975.63 10.3%
37 Rhode Island $10,992,338,000 $10,465.98 21.6%
38 Mississippi $10,458,549,000 $3,503.79 10.3%
39 New Hampshire $8,807,691,000 $6,668.87 13.6%
40 New Mexico $7,866,206,000 $3,771.79 9.8%
41 Idaho $7,622,490,000 $4,776.81 13.1%
42 Hawaii $6,511,578,000 $4,676.81 9.0%
43 West Virginia $6,498,502,000 $3,502.46 9.4%
44 Maine $6,229,189,000 $4,686.45 11.6%
45 North Dakota $5,664,860,000 $8,096.96 12.3%
46 South Dakota $5,136,249,000 $6,163.35 12.1%
47 Alaska $4,898,780,000 $6,697.36 9.4%
48 Montana $4,383,727,000 $4,361.31 10.8%
49 Wyoming $3,828,379,000 $6,641.74 10.0%
50 Vermont $3,524,887,000 $5,630.71 12.9%
Puerto Rico[5] $3,067,234,000 $836.42 N/A
TOTAL[6] $2,514,838,095,000 7,918.73 (US Avg.) 16.1%

GSP is the Gross State Product

Fiscal Year 2011

This table lists the tax revenue collected from each state, plus the District of Columbia and the territory of Puerto Rico by the IRS in fiscal year 2011, which ran from October 1, 2010, through September 30, 2011. The gross collections total only reflects the revenue collected from the categories listed in the table, and not the entire revenue collected by the IRS. Per capita values are based on population estimates from the Census Bureau for July 1, 2011.[7]

Rank State Gross collections[8] Revenue per capita (est.) Ratio to GSP
1 California $281,227,298,000 $7,462.79 14.4%
2 New York $202,149,306,000 $10,365.77 17.5%
3 Texas $198,295,817,000 $7,736.33 15.2%
4 Illinois $119,116,442,000 $9,262.73 17.8%
5 Florida $116,758,697,000 $6,118.70 15.5%
6 New Jersey $112,103,329,000 $12,688.87 23.0%
7 Ohio $112,069,407,000 $9,710.54 23.2%
8 Pennsylvania $103,134,437,000 $8,092.82 17.8%
9 Massachusetts $77,218,196,000 $11,687.33 19.7%
10 Minnesota $72,676,800,000 $13,591.31 25.8%
11 Georgia $60,601,096,000 $6,175.93 14.5%
12 Virginia $60,074,032,000 $7,412.54 14.0%
13 North Carolina $56,809,844,000 $5,886.36 12.9%
14 Michigan $55,625,833,000 $5,631.97 14.4%
15 Washington $52,531,569,000 $7,698.89 14.8%
16 Maryland $49,083,255,000 $8,405.28 16.3%
17 Missouri $46,794,981,000 $7,787.50 18.8%
18 Connecticut $45,561,956,000 $12,702.97 19.8%
19 Tennessee $45,189,610,000 $7,061.11 17.0%
20 Indiana $43,886,554,000 $6,734.83 15.8%
21 Colorado $40,328,519,000 $7,882.36 15.3%
22 Wisconsin $38,866,764,000 $6,806.98 15.3%
23 Louisiana $35,888,004,000 $7,844.77 14.5%
24 Arizona $32,920,415,000 $5,090.28 12.7%
25 Arkansas $26,326,077,000 $8,958.77 24.9%
26 Kentucky $24,451,664,000 $5,599.43 14.8%
27 Oklahoma $24,400,086,000 $6,447.95 15.7%
28 Oregon $22,366,343,000 $5,782.06 11.5%
29 Delaware $21,088,276,000 $23,221.47 32.1%
30 Alabama $20,394,671,000 $4,245.63 11.8%
31 Kansas $19,758,229,000 $6,883.47 15.1%
District of Columbia $19,619,128,000 $31,693.85 18.2%
32 Iowa $17,805,295,000 $5,810.94 12.0%
33 South Carolina $17,465,006,000 $3,737.15 10.5%
34 Nebraska $15,664,192,000 $8,502.82 16.6%
35 Utah $14,700,936,000 $5,223.57 11.8%
36 Nevada $13,032,725,000 $4,791.39 10.0%
37 Rhode Island $10,428,091,000 $9,925.41 20.8%
38 Mississippi $9,183,541,000 $3,084.36 9.4%
39 New Hampshire $8,702,370,000 $6,603.68 13.7%
40 New Mexico $8,039,313,000 $3,867.52 10.1%
41 West Virginia $6,386,378,000 $3,442.96 9.6%
42 Idaho $6,345,865,000 $4,006.88 11.0%
43 Maine $6,153,147,000 $4,631.50 11.9%
44 Hawaii $6,127,725,000 $4,446.41 9.1%
45 North Dakota $4,917,384,000 $7,181.39 12.2%
46 Alaska $4,860,572,000 $6,714.80 9.5%
47 South Dakota $4,624,947,000 $5,615.57 11.5%
48 Montana $4,197,002,000 $4,206.82 11.0%
49 Wyoming $3,516,453,000 $6,197.97 9.3%
50 Vermont $3,333,342,000 $5,319.80 12.9%
Puerto Rico $3,313,199,000 $896.89 N/A
TOTAL[6] $2,406,114,118,000 7,631.63 (Avg.) 16.0%

Maps and graphs

Map of total federal tax revenue by state in 2007.
Legend:
Map of average federal tax revenue per capita by state in 2007.
Legend:
Share of federal revenue from different tax sources. Individual income taxes (blue), payroll taxes/FICA (green), corporate income taxes (red).

See also

Federal taxes:

State taxes:

General:

Notes

  1. ^
  2. ^
  3. ^ http://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/regional/gdp_state/2013/pdf/gsp0613.pdf
  4. ^ The District of Columbia is not a U.S. state, but its residents pay federal taxes.
  5. ^ Puerto Rico is not a U.S. state but residents pay federal taxes; however, most are not required to pay federal income tax.
  6. ^ a b ratio to GSP is excluding Puerto Rico
  7. ^
  8. ^

References

  • 2007 Population, US Census.
  • Total Tax Revenue By Type and State Fiscal Year 2007 (XLS)
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