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Euramerica

Euramerica (also known as Laurussia (not to be confused with Laurasia), the Old Red Continent or the Old Red Sandstone Continent) was a minor supercontinent created in the Devonian as the result of a collision between the Laurentian, Baltica, and Avalonia cratons (Caledonian orogeny). 300 million years ago in the Late Carboniferous tropical rainforests lay over the equator of Euramerica. A major, abrupt change in vegetation occurred when the climate aridified. The forest fragmented and the lycopsids which dominated these wetlands thinned out, being replaced by opportunistic ferns. There was also a great loss of amphibian diversity and simultaneously the drier climate spurred the diversification of reptiles.[1]

Contents

  • Extent 1
  • Events 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Extent

Euramerica in the Devonian

Euramerica became a part of the major supercontinent Pangaea in the Permian. In the Jurassic, when Pangaea rifted into two continents, Gondwana and Laurasia, Euramerica was a part of Laurasia.

In the Cretaceous, Laurasia split into the continents of North America and Eurasia. The Laurentian craton became a part of North America while Baltica became a part of Eurasia, and Avalonia was split between the two.

Events

Carboniferous: Climate change devastated tropical rainforests, fragmenting the forests into isolated 'islands' and causing the extinction of many plant and animal species during the Carboniferous Rainforest Collapse (CRC).

Permian: Euramerica became a part of the major supercontinent Pangaea

Jurassic: Pangaea rifted into Gondwana and Laurasia

Cretaceous: Laurasia split into the continents of North America and Eurasia.

See also

References

  1. ^ Sahney, S., Benton, M.J. & Falcon-Lang, H.J. (2010). "Rainforest collapse triggered Pennsylvanian tetrapod diversification in Euramerica" (PDF). Geology 38 (12): 1079–1082.  

External links

  • Palaeos Earth: Geography: Euramerica
  • Paleogeographic globe of the Devonian Earth


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