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Cactus wren

Cactus wren
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Troglodytidae
Genus: Campylorhynchus
Species: C. brunneicapillus
Binomial name
Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus
Lafresnaye, 1835[2]
Distribution map of the cactus wren.

The cactus wren (Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus) is a species of wren that is native to the southwestern United States southwards to central Mexico.

Contents

  • Description 1
  • Diet 2
  • Habitat 3
  • Behavior 4
  • State bird 5
  • Gallery 6
  • References 7
  • External links 8

Description

The cactus wren is the largest North American wren, at 18–23 cm (7.1–9.1 in) long. Unlike the smaller wrens, the cactus wren is easily seen. It has the loud voice characteristic of wrens. The cactus wren is much less shy than most of the family. Its marked white eyestripe, brown head, barred wings and tail, and spotted tail feathers make it easy to identify. Like most birds in its genus, it has a slightly curved bill. There is little sexual dimorphism.

Diet

The cactus wren primarily eats insects, including ants, beetles, grasshoppers, and wasps. Occasionally, it will take seeds, fruits, small reptiles and frogs. Foraging begins late in the morning and is versatile; the cactus wren will search under leaves and ground litter and overturn objects in search of insects, as well as feeding in the foliage and branches of larger vegetation. Increasing temperatures cause a shift in foraging behavior to shady and cooler microclimates, and activity slows during hot afternoon temperatures. Almost all water is obtained from food, and free-standing water is rarely used even when found (Udvardy 1994; Ricklefs 1968; McCarthey 2000).

Habitat

At nest in Desert Botanical Garden, Phoenix AZ
It is a bird of arid regions, and is often found around yucca, mesquite or saguaro; it nests in cactus plants, sometimes in a hole in a saguaro, sometimes where its nest will be protected by the prickly cactus spines of a cholla or leaves of a yucca.

Behavior

The cactus wren forms permanent pair bonds, and the pairs defend a territory where they live all through the year.

In residential areas, cactus wrens are notorious for getting into mischief. Being curious birds, it is not uncommon for these wrens to be found flying about out-of-place in automobiles where the owner has left a window open or it may even enter homes with an open door or window and find itself trapped.

State bird

The cactus wren is the state bird of Arizona.

Gallery

References

  1. ^  
  2. ^ "Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus".  

External links

Media related to at Wikimedia Commons Data related to Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus at Wikispecies

  • Cactus Wren videos (Tree of Life)
  • Cactus Wren videos on the Internet Bird Collection
  • Stamps (for Mexico, United States) with RangeMap
  • Cactus Wren photos VIREO


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