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Apfelstrudel

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Apfelstrudel

Apple strudel (German: Apfelstrudel) is a traditional Viennese strudel, a popular pastry in Austria and in many countries in Europe that once belonged to the Austro-Hungarian empire (1867–1918).

History

A strudel is a type of sweet or savoury layered pastry with a filling inside, that gained popularity in the 18th century through the Habsburg Empire (1278-1780). Austrian cuisine was formed and influenced by the cuisines of many different people (Turkish, Bosnian, Swiss, Alsatian, French, Dutch, Italian, German, Bohemian-Moravian, Hungarian, Polish, Croatian, Slovenian, Slovakian, Serbian, and Jewish cuisines) during the many centuries of the Austrian Habsburg Empire's expansion.[1] Strudel is related to the Ottoman Empire's pastry baklava, and came to Austria via Turkish to Hungarian and then Hungarian to Austrian cuisine.[2] "Strudel," a German word, derives from the Middle High German word for "whirlpool" or "eddy".[3]

Strudel is most often associated with the Austrian cuisine, but is also a traditional pastry in the whole area formerly belonging to the Austro-Hungarian empire. In these countries, apple strudel is the most widely known kind of strudel.[4][5] Apple strudel is considered to be the national dish of Austria along with Wiener Schnitzel and Tafelspitz.[6] Apple strudel in Hungarian is called Almásrétes;[7] the word "Apfelstrudel" is German for strudel with apple.[7]

The oldest known Strudel recipe is from 1696, a handwritten recipe housed at the Wiener Stadtbibliothek.[8]

Pastry


Apple strudel consists of an oblong strudel pastry jacket with an apple filling inside.[9] The filling is made of grated cooking apples (usually of a tart, crisp, and aromatic variety such as Winesap apples[5]), sugar, cinnamon,[10] raisins,[11] and bread crumbs.

Strudel uses an unleavened dough. The basic dough consists of flour, oil (or butter) and salt although as a household recipe, many variations exist.

Apple strudel dough is a thin, elastic dough,[12] the traditional preparation of which is a difficult process. The dough is kneaded by flogging, often against a table top. Dough that appears thick or lumpy after flogging is generally discarded and a new batch is started. After kneading, the dough is rested, then rolled out on a wide surface,[13] and stretched until the dough reaches a thickness similar to phyllo. Cooks say that a single layer should be so thin that one can read a newspaper through it.[7][14]

Filling is arranged in a line on a comparatively small section of dough, after which the dough is folded over the filling, and the remaining dough is wrapped around until all the dough has been used. The strudel is then oven baked, and served warm. Apple strudel is traditionally served in slices, sprinkled with powdered sugar.[4]

Serving

Toppings of vanilla ice cream, whipped cream, custard, or vanilla sauce are popular in many countries. Apple strudel can be accompanied by tea, coffee[7] or even champagne, and is one of the most common treats at Viennese cafés.[15]

See also

Food portal

References

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