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Riley Ingram

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Riley Ingram

Riley Ingram
Member of the Virginia House of Delegates
from the 62nd district
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 1992
Preceded by R. Beasley Jones
Personal details
Born ( 1941 -10-01) October 1, 1941 (age 72)
Halifax County, Virginia
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Mary Ann Brinkley (deceased)
Children Tracy Crowder, Stacy Hansen, Riley Ingram Jr.
Residence Hopewell, Virginia
Occupation Real estate
Committees Counties, Cities and Towns (chair)
Appropriations
Privileges and Elections
Religion Church of the Nazarene
Military service
Service/branch United States Army
Years of service 1959–1968
Unit Virginia Army National Guard 1959–1962
United States Army Reserve 1962–1968

Riley Edward Ingram (born October 1, 1941) is an American politician. Since 1992 he has served in the Virginia House of Delegates, representing the 62nd district east of Richmond, made up of parts of Chesterfield, Henrico and Prince George Counties and the city of Hopewell. He is a member of the Republican Party. [1]

Ingram was co-chair of the House committee on Counties, Cities and Towns 1998–2001 and has been chair since 2002. He has served on the committees on Appropriations (1998–), Counties, Cities and Towns (1992–), General Laws (1998–2001), Militia and Police (2000–2001), Mining and Mineral Resources (1992–1999), and Privileges and Elections (1992–).[2]

Electoral history

Ingram was elected to the Hopewell city council in 1986, and became mayor in 1988.[1]

In 1989, he challenged 28-year Democratic incumbent C. Hardaway Marks in the 64th House district, but lost. He was re-elected to the Hopewell city council in 1990.[3]

In the 1991 redistricting, the 62nd House district was moved northwards to include Hopewell. Ingram defeated another Democratic incumbent, R. Beasley Jones, for the House seat.[3]

Date Election Candidate Party Votes  %
Virginia House of Delegates, 64th district
Nov 7, 1989[3] General C. Hardaway Marks Democratic 8,992 56.32
Riley Edward Ingram Republican 6,971 43.66
Write Ins 3 0.02
Incumbent won; seat stayed Democratic
Virginia House of Delegates, 62nd district
Nov 5, 1991[3] General Riley Edward Ingram Republican 7,589 54.03
Robert Beasley Jones Democratic 6,454 45.95
Write Ins 2 0.02
Incumbent lost; seat switched from Democratic to Republican
Nov 2, 1993[3] General Riley Edward Ingram Republican 12,380 69.52
Peter D. Eliades Democratic 5,428 30.48
Nov 7, 1995[4] General R E Ingram Republican 11,981 74.29
D M Brown Democratic 4,147 25.71
Nov 4, 1997[5] General Riley E. Ingram Republican 13,123 99.64
Write Ins 47 0.36
Nov 2, 1999[6] General R E Ingram Republican 10,940 99.73
Write Ins 30 0.27
Nov 6, 2001[7] General R E Ingram Republican 14,476 97.87
Write Ins 315 2.13
Nov 4, 2003[8] General R E Ingram Republican 9,720 98.67
Write Ins 131 1.33
Nov 8, 2005[9] General R E Ingram Republican 15,571 97.00
Write Ins 481 3.00
Nov 6, 2007[10] General Riley Edward Ingram Republican 10,449 98.15
Write Ins 196 1.84
Nov 3, 2009[11] General Riley Edward Ingram Republican 15,514 97.51
Write Ins 396 2.48
Nov 8, 2011[12] General Riley Edward Ingram Republican 8,911 95.80
Write Ins 390 4.19

Notes

External links

  • (campaign finance)
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