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Yildirim Army Group

 

Yildirim Army Group

Yildirim Army Group
Active July 1917[1] - November 7, 1918[2][3]
Country Ottoman Empire
Type Army group
Size 150,000
Patron Sultans of the Ottoman Empire
Engagements Sinai and Palestine Campaign (World War I)
Battle of Megiddo
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Erich von Falkenhayn (July 1917[1] - February 6, 1918[4])
Otto Liman von Sanders (February 24[5] - October 30, 1918)
Mustafa Kemal Atatürk (October 31 - November 7, 1918[2])

The Yildirim Army Group or Thunderbolt Army Group of the Ottoman Empire (Turkish: Yıldırım Ordular Grubu) or Army Group F (German: Heeresgruppe F) was one of the army groups of the Ottoman Army. It was formed during World War I.

Contents

  • World War I 1
    • Order of Battle, August 1917 1.1
    • Order of Battle, January 1918 1.2
    • Order of Battle, June 1918 1.3
    • Order of Battle, September 1918 1.4
  • After Mudros 2
    • Order of Battle, November 1918 2.1
    • Yildirim Troops Inspectorate, May 1919 2.2
  • Sources 3
  • External links 4

World War I

Order of Battle, August 1917

In August 1917, the army group was structured as follows:[6]

with the

  • 42nd Division
  • 48th Division
  • 59th Division[7]
    • XX Corps at Huj
      • 16th Division
      • 54th Division
      • 178th Infantry Regiment
      • 3rd Cavalry Division
    • XXII Corps at Gaza
      • 3rd Division
      • 7th Division
      • 53rd Division[8][9]

Order of Battle, January 1918

In January 1918, the army group was structured as follows:[10]

Order of Battle, June 1918

In June 1918, the army group was structured as follows:[11]

Order of Battle, September 1918

In September 1918, the army group was structured as follows:[12]

After Mudros

Order of Battle, November 1918

In November 1918, the army group was structured as follows:[13]

Yildirim Troops Inspectorate, May 1919

In April 1919, Şevket Turgut Pasha, Cevat Çobanlı and Fevzi Çakmak hold a secret meeting in Constantinople. They prepared a report called "Trio Oath" (Üçler Misâkı) and decided to establish army inspectorate for the defense of homeland. In late April, Fevzi Çakmak submitted this report to the Minister of War Şakir Pasha. On April 30, 1919, the War Ministry and Sultan Mehmed VI ratified the decision about the establishing of army inspectorates that had been accepted by the Chief of General Staff[14] And then the First Army Troops Inspectorate (stationed in Constantinople, Fevzi Çakmak), the Yildirim Troops Inspectorate (stationed in Konya, Cemal Mersinli, later Second Army Inspectorate) Inspectorate, the Ninth Army Troops Inspectorate (stationed in Erzurum, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, later Third Army Inspectorate) was formed. Additionally, the Rumeli Military Troops Inspectorate (Nureddin Pasha) would be established and the XIII Corps would be under the direction of the Ministry of War.[15] In May 1919, the army inspectorate was structured as follows:[16][17]

Sources

  1. ^ a b Edward J. Erickson, Order to Die: A History of the Ottoman Army in the First World War, Greenwood Press, 2001, ISBN 0-313-31516-7, p. 169.
  2. ^ a b T.C. Genelkurmay Harp Tarihi Başkanlığı Yayınları, Türk İstiklâl Harbine Katılan Tümen ve Daha Üst Kademlerdeki Komutanların Biyografileri, Genkurmay Başkanlığı Basımevi, Ankara, 1972, p. 9. (Turkish)
  3. ^ Zekeriya Türkmen, Mütareke Döneminde Ordunun Durumu ve Yeniden Yapılanması (1918-1920), Türk Tarih Kurumu Basımevi, 2001, ISBN 975-16-1372-8, p. 48. (Turkish)
  4. ^ Edward J. Erickson, Order to Die: A History of the Ottoman Army in the First World War, Greenwood Press, 2001, ISBN 0-313-31516-7, p. 193.
  5. ^ Edward J. Erickson, Order to Die: A History of the Ottoman Army in the First World War, Greenwood Press, 2001, ISBN 0-313-31516-7, p. 194.
  6. ^ Edward J. Erickson, Order to Die: A History of the Ottoman Army in the First World War, Greenwood Press, 2001, ISBN 0-313-31516-7, p. 170.
  7. ^ Falls24
  8. ^ Erickson 2001 p. 163
  9. ^ Falls 1930 Vol. 2 p. 35
  10. ^ Edward J. Erickson, Order to Die: A History of the Ottoman Army in the First World War, Greenwood Press, 2001, ISBN 0-313-31516-7, p. 181.
  11. ^ Edward J. Erickson, Order to Die: A History of the Ottoman Army in the First World War, Greenwood Press, 2001, ISBN 0-313-31516-7, p. 188.
  12. ^ Edward J. Erickson, Order to Die: A History of the Ottoman Army in the First World War, Greenwood Press, 2001, ISBN 0-313-31516-7, p. 197.
  13. ^ Edward J. Erickson, Order to Die: A History of the Ottoman Army in the First World War, Greenwood Press, 2001, ISBN 0-313-31516-7, p. 202.
  14. ^ Zekeriya Türkmen, Mütareke Döneminde Ordunun Durumu ve Yeniden Yapılanması (1918-1920), Türk Tarih Kurumu Basımevi, 2001, ISBN 975-16-1372-8, p. 105. (Turkish)
  15. ^ Zekeriya Türkmen, Mütareke Döneminde Ordunun Durumu ve Yeniden Yapılanması (1918-1920), Türk Tarih Kurumu Basımevi, 2001, ISBN 975-16-1372-8, p. 106. (Turkish)
  16. ^ Zekeriya Türkmen, Mütareke Döneminde Ordunun Durumu ve Yeniden Yapılanması (1918-1920), Türk Tarih Kurumu Basımevi, 2001, ISBN 975-16-1372-8, p. 333. (Turkish)
  17. ^ Zekeriya Türkmen, Mütareke Döneminde Ordunun Durumu ve Yeniden Yapılanması (1918-1920), Türk Tarih Kurumu Basımevi, 2001, ISBN 975-16-1372-8, pp. 110-111. (Turkish)

External links

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