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Air University (AU) Press, a division of the Air Force Research Institute Maxwell AFB, Alabama, publishes school-selected student papers, faculty research efforts, textbooks, and curriculum-related materials, as well as the Air University Catalog and other administrative documents that directly support AU's program of professional military education (PME).

The series of school-sponsored papers we support include Air War College’s Maxwell Papers, Air Command and Staff College's Wright Flyers, theses by students at the School of Advanced Air and Space Studies (SAASS), and the College of Aerospace Doctrine, Research and Education's (CADRE) Papers. AU Press itself sponsors the Fairchild Papers, selected essays having research value to the Air Force.

Under the guidance of the AU Publication Review Board, at the instruction of higher level headquarters, and in cooperation with Air Force agencies, we also publish monographs, books, and other research and educational materials, as well as the English, Spanish, Portuguese, Arabic, Chinese, and French editions of Air and Space Power Journal, the professional flagship journal of the Air Force.

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Third World Traps and Pitfalls : Ballistic Missiles, Cruise Missil...

By: Major William C. Story, JR., USAF

Two examples from twentieth-century conflicts demonstrate the potential that missiles possess to disrupt an opponent’s land-based airpower and achieve significant political consequences. Iraq’s use of Scud ballistic missiles in the 1991 Persian Gulf War produced nearly instantaneous political effects. The Scuds did not threaten the coalition military forces opposing Saddam Hussein, but instead threatened the existence of the coalition itself by nearly bringing Israel int...

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The Air Refueling Receiver that Does Not Complain

By: Major Jeffrey L. Stephenson, USAF

This study focuses on the development of aerial refueling methods and procedures for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). The author states the need for UAVs, lists assumptions, and gives a brief background on them. His discussion of the three current Air Force UAV systems (Predator, DarkStar, and Global Hawk) is followed by some proposed methods and procedures for rendezvous and aerial refueling of these UAV platforms. The author rounds out his discussion by comparing and an...

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Rethinking the Air Operations Center : Air Force Command and Contr...

By: Major J. Taylor Sink, USAF

The study concludes with recommendations for rethinking the Air Operations Center. Methods for improving responsiveness include time-value based target analysis, greater use of alert or reserve forces, on-board mission planning, and limited decentralization, with mission-type orders and commander’s intent transmitted to lower echelons. Solutions for improving assessment include delegating target assessment functions to the wings, focusing theater-level intelligence perso...

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Planning Airpower Strategies : Enhancing the Capability of Air Com...

By: Major Charles K. Shugg, USAF

This study attempts to determine whether air component commands are capable of developing an effective airpower strategy. It examines US Central Command Air Forces (CENTAF) because of its recent experience in developing and executing a sizable airpower contribution to a theater campaign. The author sets the background by describing CENTAF’s role in the Persian Gulf War theater campaign strategy. The conclusion is that the commander in chief (CINC) of Central Command did ...

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The Airship’s Potential for Intertheater and Intratheater Airlift

By: Lieutenant Colonel Donald E. Ryan Jr., USAF

This paper asserts there exists a dangerous GAP in US strategic intertheater transportation capabilities, propounds a model describing the GAP, and proposes a solution to the problem. Using the Gulf War logistics flow as a model, the three phase points are shown and their airlift/sealift tradeoffs discussed. Other logistics support options, which figured in the war, such as prepositioning and host nation support, are discussed and the Kuwaiti Theater of Operations shown ...

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Beyond the Industrial Web : Economic Synergies and Targeting Metho...

By: Major Steven M. Rinaldi, USAF

In this thesis, we propose a new manner of targeting economies—a holistic approach that accounts for the linkages between infrastructure elements and their resultant synergies. We first establish a theoretical foundation for targeting based on complexity science. This discipline examines the nature of complex, interconnected systems such as economies. Next, we demonstrate that economies are indeed highly interconnected systems. These linkages cannot be ignored in the tar...

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Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Weapons of Mass Destruction : A Letha...

By: Major Jeffrey N. Renehan, USAF

This study analyzes the characteristics and capabilities of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) to determine their capability to carry weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The author presents an overview of the various forms of WMD—chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons. The objective is to review the characteristics of both UAVs and WMD to determine if they are capable of being used together as an effective weapon. The result indicates that there is great potential for the ...

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Preventive Attack in the 1990s?

By: Major Steven R. Prebeck, USAF

The decline of the Soviet Union upset the world’s balance of power and opened the door to third world proliferation since the superpowers no longer have tight control over their client-states. This increase in proliferation raised the issue of how the United States (US) should respond to a third world nation that is acquiring nuclear weapons. Should the United States depend on preventive attacks to stop the proliferation of nuclear weapons? Preventive attacks are politic...

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Coercive Air Strategy : Forcing a Bureaucratic Shift

By: Major John I. Pray, USAF

The purpose of this work is to provide the air planner with an air strategy that may, under certain defined conditions, be more likely to yield success than current air power theories. Our current stock of strategic ideas tend to rely on a unitary, rational actor assumption to describe the decision-making environments of our potential adversaries. We believe reliance on this simplistic assumption may skew the counterstrategy development process. We propose an alternate d...

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The Links between Science, Philosophy, and Military Theory : Under...

By: Lieutenant Colonel Robert P. Pellegrini, USA

This study examines the links between science, philosophy, and military theory. The author uses two case studies to demonstrate the links between these disciplines. He presents an overview on the rise of Newtonian science, and he examines how the key frameworks and concepts of that science became interwoven into Western civilization to affect its philosophy with an emphasis on its interpretation by the German Romanticist philosopher Immanuel Kant. He then shows how Newto...

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Enhancement of the Civil Reserve Air Fleet : An Alternative for Br...

By: Major William G. Palmby, USAF

This study determines if a revival of the CRAF Enhancement Program is feasible and if it could be developed into a viable program for addressing AMC's airlift shortfall problem. To achieve this goal, the study analyzes the failure of the first CRAF Enhancement Program to determine if the barriers to its success were surmountable and if these same barriers might impede the success of a future program. The study determines that the first Enhancement Program failed because ...

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A Kill Is a Kill : Asymmetrically Attacking US Airpower

By: Major Michael A. O’Halloran, USMC

This study analyzes the asymmetric threat to U.S. airpower across the political, operational, and tactical levels of war and examines whether the U.S. has adequately prepared itself to counter asymmetrical measures against its airpower assets. The answers are not reassuring.

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To War on Tubing and Canvas : A Case Study in the Interrelationshi...

By: Lieutenant Colonel Jonathan C. Noetzel, USAF

The study reviews each force’s combat glider experience and analyzes it in light of the glider doctrine, or lack thereof, with which each began the war. While military cargo gliders have seen their day, recent technological advances in gliders make them a viable platform for certain missions requiring stealth and silence.

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To War on Tubing and Canvas : A Case Study in the Interrelationshi...

By: Lieutenant Colonel Jonathan C. Noetzel, USAF

The study reviews each force’s combat glider experience and analyzes it in light of the glider doctrine, or lack thereof, with which each began the war. While military cargo gliders have seen their day, recent technological advances in gliders make them a viable platform for certain missions requiring stealth and silence.

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The Secret Air War over France : USAAF Special Operations Units in...

By: Major Bernard V. Moore, II,USAF

This paper presents an historical account of the operations of United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) special operations units in the French campaign of 1944. The purpose of this paper is two-fold. First, it is intended to be a brief history of the creation, development and combat record of these units. Second, it is intended for use as an example of the utility and effectiveness of air force special operations in high intensity conventional warfare.

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The Sum of Their Fears : The Relationship between the Joint Target...

By: Major Michael R. Moeller, USAF

This thesis follows the history of joint targeting boards since World War II to illustrate the foundations that have led to today’s joint airpower targeting process. Having established the historical background, this thesis explores the current solutions for determining airpower mission and target priorities. Using the principles of war as a framework for analysis, this thesis compares the relative advantages and disadvantages of each model to determine whether a targeti...

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Projecting American Airpower : Should We Buy Bombers, Carriers, or...

By: Major Roy Michael Mattson, USAF

The purpose of this thesis is to determine which form of airpower will best serve American power projection requirements as we approach the turn of the century. It examines three forms of airpower: carrier air, long-range combat air (B-2), and theater air (i.e., F-15, F-16, and EF-111). The author concludes that theater aircraft are the mainstay of US airpower. Theater airpower was the decisive form of airpower in our three major conflicts since World War II (Korea, Viet...

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A Historical View of Air Policing Doctrine Lessons from the Britis...

By: Major Michael A. Longoria, USAF

This paper reviews the historical accounts of the Royal Air Force (R.A.F) experiences in air policing during the interwar period, 1919-1939. It analyzes the evidence from the view of operational doctrine and applies an in-depth look at the basic tenets of R.A.F. air policing campaigns. It seeks to answer the question: to what doctrine did air commanders subscribe? It further analyzes the development of air policing tactical doctrine throughout the interwar period. It sum...

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Lieutenant General Ned Almond, USAA Ground Commander’s Conflicting...

By: Major Michael Lewis, USAF

This study analyzes the historical debate between the United States Army (USA) and United States Air Force over the issue of close air support (CAS). Specifically,this study examines four CAS subissues from World War I through the Korean War:priorities in the employment of airpower, the ownership and apportionment of CASassets, the most effective CAS command and control (C2) system, and the debate overwhether to procure a single or multipurpose CAS aircraft. The case stu...

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The Failure of Third World Air Power : Iraq and the War with Iran

By: Major Douglas A. Kupersmith, USAF

This paper explains why the Iraqi performance in Desert Storm was predictable: Nonindustrialized, third world nations are incapable of fielding a decisive, conventional air force. To illustrate the point, this essay studies Iraq’s performance in the war against Iran. During the conflict, the Iraqi air force obtained all the equipment and training money could buy, but after eight years of combat experience it still made only minor contributions in a war effort against an ...

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