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Guy Mannering, Or the Astrologer, Vol. I

By: Sir Walter Scott

Among those who took the most lively interest in endeavouring to discover the person by whom young Charles Hazlewood had been waylaid and wounded was Gilbert Glossin, Esquire, late writer in —, now Laird of Ellangowan, and one of the worshipful commission of justices of the peace for the county of—. His motives for exertion on this occasion were manifold; but we presume that our readers, from what they already know of this gentleman, will acquit him of being actuated by ...

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The Exploits of Elaine

By: Arthur Benjamin Reeve

Excerpt: Chapter 1. THE CLUTCHING HAND. ?Jameson, here?s a story I wish you?d follow up,? remarked the managing editor of the Star to me one evening after I had turned in an assignment of the late afternoon. He handed me a clipping from the evening edition of the Star and I quickly ran my eye over the headline: ?THE CLUTCHING HAND? WINS AGAIN NEW YORK?S MYSTERIOUS MASTER CRIMINAL PERFECTS ANOTHER COUP CITY POLICE COMPLETELY BAFFLED. ?Here?s this murder of Fletcher, the r...

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The Tryst

By: Algernon Henry Blackwood

As he got out of the train at the little wayside station he remembered the conversation as if it had been yesterday, instead of fifteen years ago—and his heart went thumping against his ribs so violently that he almost heard it. The original thrill came over him again with all its infinite yearning. He felt it as he had felt it then—not with that tragic lessening the interval had brought to each repetition of its memory. Here, in the familiar scenery of its birth, he rea...

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The Spirit of Crow Butte

By: John G. Neihardt

Excerpt: SHOULD a European fashion a personification of Martyrdom, it would have a white face. This is a reproach to the blind egotism of individual races. There is a story that the old bucks tell to the staring youths huddled about the winter fires, which is a simple plea for the brotherhood of humanity pale and swarthy. A noble deed has many whispering tongues, and becomes a part of nature like the wind, and the Omaha from whom I had this simple legend knew not whence ...

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The Lion and the Unicorn

By: Richard Harding Davis

Prentiss had a long lease on the house, and because it stood in Jermyn Street the upper floors were, as a matter of course, turned into lodgings for single gentlemen; and because Prentiss was a Florist to the Queen, he placed a lion and unicorn over his flowershop, just in front of the middle window on the first floor. By stretching a little, each of them could see into the window just beyond him, and could hear all that was said inside; and such things as they saw and h...

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The Family of Love

By: Thomas Middleton

Preface: Too soon and too late is this work is published: too soon, in that it was in the press before I had notice of it, by which means some faults may escape in the printing; too late, for that it was not published when the general voice of the people had sealed it for good, and the newness of it made it much more desired than at this time. For plays in this city are like wenches new?fallen to the trade: only desired of your neatest gallants whiles they're fresh; when...

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Twelve Topics on the Faith

By: Gregory Thaumaturgus

IF any one says that the body of Christ is uncreated, and refuses to acknowledge that He, being the uncreated Word (God) of God, took the flesh of created humanity and appeared incarnate, even as it is written, let him be anathema. EXPLICATION. How could the body be said to be uncreated? For the uncreated is the passionless, invulnerable, intangible. But Christ, on rising from the dead, showed His disciples the print of the nails and the wound made by the spear, and a bo...

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The Green Rust

By: Edgar Wallace

I DON'T know whether there's a law that stops my doing this, Jim; but if there is, you've got to get round it. You're a lawyer and you know the game. You're my pal and the best pal I've had, Jim, and you'll do it for me. The dying man looked up into the old eyes that were watching him with such compassion and read their acquiescence. No greater difference could be imagined than existed between the man on the bed and the slim neat figure who sat by his side. John Millinbo...

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Before Adam

By: Jack London

Pictures! Pictures! Pictures! Often, before I learned, did I wonder whence came the multitudes of pictures that thronged my dreams; for they were pictures the like of which I had never seen in real wake-a-day life. They tormented my childhood, making of my dreams a procession of nightmares and a little later convincing me that I was different from my kind, a creature unnatural and accursed. In my days only did I attain any measure of happiness. My nights marked the reign...

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Hans Huckebein

By: Wilhelm Busch

Excerpt: Hans Huckebein, der Ungluecksrabe. Hier sieht man Fritz, den muntern Knaben, Nebst Huckebein, dem jungen Raben. Und dieser Fritz, wie alle Knaben, Will einen Raben gerne haben. Schon rutscht er auf dem Ast daher, Der Vogel, der misstraut ihm sehr. Schlapp! macht der Fritz von seiner Kappe Mit Listen eine VogelKlappe.

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Twentythree and a Half Hours' Leave

By: Mary Roberts Rinehart

Excerpt: I. THE Headquarters Troop were preparing to leave camp and move towards the East, where at an Atlantic port they would take ship and the third step toward saving democracy. Now the Headquarters Troop are a cavalry organisation, their particular function being, so far as the lay mind can grasp it, to form a circle round the general and keep shells from falling on him. Not that this close affiliation gives them any right to friendly relations with that aloof and p...

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Pinocchio

By: Carlo Collodi

Excerpt: Come ando che maestro Ciliegia, falegname, trovo un pezzo di legno, che piangeva e rideva come un bambino. C'era una volta... Un re! diranno subito i miei piccoli lettori. No, ragazzi, avete sbagliato. C'era una volta un pezzo di legno. Non era un legno di lusso, ma un semplice pezzo da catasta, di quelli che d'inverno si mettono nelle stufe e nei caminetti per accendere il fuoco e per riscaldare le stanze. Non so come andasse, ma il fatto gli e che un bel giorn...

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What Can She Do

By: Edward Payson Roe

Preface: This book was not written to amuse, to create purposeless excitement, or to secure a little praise as a bit of artistic work. It would probably fail in all these things. It was written with a definite, earnest purpose, which I trust will be apparent to the reader. As society in our land grows older, and departs from primitive simplicity, as many are becoming rich, but more poor, the changes that I have sought to warn against become more threatening. The ordinary...

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The Bridgebuilders

By: Rudyard Kipling

Excerpt: THE least that Findlayson, of the Public Works Department, expected was a C.I.E.; he dreamed of a C.S.I. Indeed, his friends told him that he deserved more. For three years he had endured heat and cold, disappointment, discomfort, danger, and disease, with responsibility almost to top?heavy for one pair of shoulders; and day by day, through that time, the great Kashi Bridge over the Ganges had grown under his charge. Now, in less than three months, if all went w...

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The Land of the Blue Flower

By: Frances Hodgson Burnett

Excerpt: Part One The Land of the Blue Flower was not called by that name until the tall, strong, beautiful King Amor came down from his castle on the mountain crag and began to reign. Before that time it was called King Mordreth?s Land, and as the first King Mordreth had been a fierce and cruel king this seemed a gloomy name. A few weeks before Amor was born, his weak, selfish boy?father whose name was King Mordreth also had been killed while hunting, and his fair mothe...

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Following the Equator, Illustrated, V5

By: Mark Twain

Excerpt: You soon find your long?ago dreams of India rising in a sort of vague and luscious moonlight above the horizon?rim of your opaque consciousness, and softly lighting up a thousand forgotten details which were parts of a vision that had once been vivid to you when you were a boy, and steeped your spirit in tales of the East. The barbaric gorgeousnesses, for instance; and the princely titles, the sumptuous titles, the sounding titles, how good they taste in the mou...

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Countess Kate

By: Charlotte M. Yonge

CHAPTER I: There, I've done every bit I can do! I'm going to see what o'clock it is. I heard it strike eleven just now. Sylvia, you'll tip up! What a tremendous stretch! Wha-ooh! Oh dear! We sha'n't get one moment before dinner! Oh, horrible! oh, horrible! most horrible! Sylvia, you know I hate hearing Hamlet profaned. You can't hate it more than having no one to hear our lessons. That makes you do it. What on earth can Mary be about? Some tiresome woman to speak to her, I suppose....

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The House Boat Boys

By: St. George Rathborne

PREFACE BY THE BISHOP OF LICHFIELD: This is a book which is wanted. Thoughtful men, in every class, are not afraid of theology, i.e. of a reasoned account of their religion, but they want a theology which can be stated without conventions and technicalities; they do not at all care for a religion which pretends to do away with all mystery, but they are glad to be assured of the essential reasonableness of the Christian Faith; they do not expect a ready-made solution of t...

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The Underdog

By: F. Hopkinson Smith

Excerpt: NO RESPECTER OF PERSONS I. THE CRIME OF SAMANTHY NORTH. I have been requested to tell this story, and exactly as it happened. The moral any man may draw for himself. I only want to ask my readers the question I have been asking myself ever since I saw the girl: Why should such things be among us?

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Letters of George Borrow to the British and Foreign Bible Society

By: George Borrow

Excerpt: REVD. AND DEAR SIR,?I have just received your communication, and notwithstanding it is Sunday morning, and the bells with their loud and clear voices are calling me to church, I have sat down to answer it by return of post. It is scarcely necessary for me to say that I was rejoiced to see the Chrestomathie Mandchou, which will be of no slight assistance in learning the Tartar dialect, on which ever since I left London I have been almost incessantly occupied. It ...

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