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Three Short Works

By: Gustave Flaubert

Excerpt: I pause an instant in my swift course over earth; throw myself down among cold tombs; and, while dark?plumaged birds rise suddenly in terror from my side, while the dead slumber peacefully, while cypress branches droop low o?er my head, while all around me weeps or lies in deep repose, my burning eyes rest on the great white clouds, gigantic winding?sheets, unrolling their slow length across the face of heaven. How many nights, and years, and ages have I journey...

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Alexander's Bridge

By: Willa Sibert Cather

CHAPTER I: Late one brilliant April afternoon Professor Lucius Wilson stood at the head of Chestnut Street, looking about him with the pleased air of a man of taste who does not very often get to Boston. He had lived there as a student, but for wenty years and more, since he had been Professor of Philosophy in a Western university, he had seldom come East except o take a steamer for some foreign port. Wilson was standing quite still, contemplating with a whimsical smile ...

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Strangers & Wayfarers

By: Sarah Orne Jewett

The passenger and mail transportation between the towns of North Kilby and Sanscrit Pond was carried on by Mr. Jefferson Briley, whose two-seated covered wagon was usually much too large for the demands of business. Both the Sanscrit Pond and North Kilby people were stayers-at-home, and Mr. Briley often made his seven-mile journey in entire solitude, except for the limp leather mail-bag, which he held firmly to the floor of the carriage with his heavily shod left foot. T...

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Philothea

By: Lydia Maria Francis Child

PREFACE: This volume is purely romance; and most readers will consider it romance of the wildest kind. A few kindred spirits, prone to people space with life and mystical predominance, will perceive a light within the Grecian Temple. For such I have written it. To minds of different mould, who may think an apology necessary for what they will deem so utterly useless, I have nothing better to offer than the simple fact that I found delight in doing it. The work has been f...

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The Middle-Aged Woman

By: Rebecca Harding Davis

CHOOSE any artist that you know — the one with the kindliest nature and the finest perceptions — and ask him to give you his idea of the genius of the commonplace, and any word for it, he paints you a middle-aged woman. The thing, he will say, proves itself. Here is a creature jogging on leisurely at midday in the sight of all men along a well-tramped road. The mists of dawn are far behind her; she has not yet reached the shadows of evening. The softness and blushes, and...

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Twenty Years After

By: Pere Alexander Dumas

In a splendid chamber of the Palais Royal, formerly styled the Palais Cardinal, a man was sitting in deep reverie, his head supported on his hands, leaning over a gilt and inlaid table which was covered with letters and papers. Behind this figure glowed a vast fireplace alive with leaping flames; great logs of oak blazed and crackled on the polished brass andirons whose flicker shone upon the superb habiliments of the lonely tenant of the room, which was illumined grandl...

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The Babylonian Story of the Deluge and the Epic of Gilgamish : Wit...

By: E. A. Wallis Budge

the city made by Commander Felix Jones, I.N. The remains of the older palaces built by Sargon II (B.C. 722-705), Sennacherib (B.C. 705-681), and Esarhaddon (B.C. 681-669) lie under the hill called Nabi Yunis, and those of the palaces and other buildings of Asshur-bani-pal (B.C. 681-626) under the mound which is known locally as Tall al-'Armushîyah, i.e., The Hill of 'Armush, and Kuyunjik. The latter name is said to be derived from two Turkish words meaning many sheep, in...

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Aphorisms and Reflections

By: Henrietta A. Huxley

Preface: Although a man by his works and personality shall have made his mark upon the age he lives in, yet when he has passed away and his influence with him, the next generation, and still more the succeeding one, will know little of this work, of his ideals and of the goal he strove to win, although for the student his scientific work may always live ...

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Jerusalem : The Emanation of the Giant Albion

By: William Blake

There is a Void, outside of Existence, which if enterd into Englobes itself & becomes a Womb, such was Albions Couch A pleasant Shadow of Repose calld Albions lovely Land His Sublime & Pathos become Two Rocks fixd in the Earth His Reason his Spectrous Power, covers them above Jerusalem his Emanation is a Stone laying beneath O [Albion behold Pitying] behold the Vision of Albion...

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The Master of the Inn

By: Robert Herrick

IT was a plain brick house, three full stories, with four broad chimneys, and overhanging eaves. The tradition was that it had been a colonial tavern—a dot among the fir-covered northern hills on the climbing post-road into Canada. The village scattered along the road below the inn was called Albany—and soon forgotten when the railroad sought an opening through a valley less rugged, eight miles to the west. Rather more than thirty years ago the Doctor had arrived, one su...

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Renascence and Other Poems

By: Edna St. Vincent Millay

Excerpt: RENASCENCE ALL I could see from where I stood Was three long mountains and a wood; I turned and looked the other way, And saw three islands in a bay. So with my eyes I traced the line Of the horizon, thin and fine, Straight around till I was come Back to where I?d started from; And all I saw from where I stood Was three long mountains and a wood. Over these things I could not see: These were the things that bounded me.

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The Categories

By: Aristotle

Excerpt: Things are said to be named ?equivocally? when, though they have a common name, the definition corresponding with the name differs for each. Thus, a real man and a figure in a picture can both lay claim to the name ?animal'; yet these are equivocally so named, for, though they have a common name, the definition corresponding with the name differs for each. For should any one define in what sense each is an animal, his definition in the one case will be appropria...

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Comida : An Experience in Famine

By: Frank Norris

Excerpt: BY grace of our guide, our phrase book, and our Salva?Webster Dictionary, we managed to pick up a good deal of Spanish during the Santiago campaign, but the one word our guide did not tell us, the one expression we did not look up in the Diccionario, was the very one we understood most quickly: its meaning was apparent the instant we heard it uttered. We shall never forget comida and all that it stands for. It means ?food;? not breakfast, dinner, or supper, not ...

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An Italian Institution

By: Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell

When the traveller, only a few years ago, entered Naples from the sea, he was struck by the circumstance that as he handed the boatman his fare, a man suddenly appeared, who looked on at the payment, and then, receiving a certain small part of it, went his way without a word. The same ceremony, with a different individual for the actor, occurred as the traveller paid his cab-fare to the hotel, and paid the porter who took down his luggage; and, doubtless, had he been abl...

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California 1849-1913

By: L. H. Wooley

The year 1849 has a peculiarly thrilling sensation to the California Pioneer, not realized by those who came at a later date. My purpose in recording some of my recollections of early days is not for publication nor aggrandizement, but that it may be deposited in the archives of my descendants, that I was one of those adventurers who left the Green Mountains of Vermont to cross the plains to California, the El Dorado— the Land of Gold. In starting out I went to Boston, N...

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Uncle Tom's Cabin

By: Harriet Beecher Stowe

Late in the afternoon of a chilly day in February, two gentlemen were sitting alone over their wine, in a well-furnished dining parlor, in the town of P --, in Kentucky. There were no servants present, and the gentlemen, with chairs closely approaching, seemed to be discussing some subject with great earnestness.

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The Parenticide Club

By: Ambrose Bierce

May it please your Honor, crimes are ghastly or agreeable only by comparison. If you were familiar with the details of my client's previous murder of his uncle you would discern in his later offense (if offense it may be called) something in the nature of tender forbearance and filial consideration for the feelings of the victim. The appalling ferocity of the former assassination was indeed inconsistent with any hypothesis but that of guilt; and had it not been for the f...

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The Cedar Closet

By: Lafcadio Hearn

Excerpt: It happened ten years ago, and it stands out, and ever will stand out, in my memory like some dark, awful barrier dividing the happy, gleeful years of girlhood, with their foolish, petulant sorrows and eager, innocent joys, and the bright, lovely life which has been mine since. In looking back, that time seems to me shadowed by a dark and terrible brooding cloud, bearing in its lurid gloom what, but for love and patience the tenderest and most untiring, might ha...

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Old Creole Days

By: Frank J. Morlock

The Cafe des Exiles, shortly before noon. Various characters enter and pass before the Cafe. D'Hemencourt, the proprietor, greets them in a friendly way. It is early, the Cafe is not yet open, but D'Hemencourt is busy getting ready for business. He is assisted by his daughter, Pauline. Madame Delicieuse passes towards her house. She greets D'Hemencourt, and calls Pauline aside; they exchange a few words. Indian Charlie lounges in the doorway of his house. He is preparing...

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A Bundle of Ballads

By: Henry Morley

INTRODUCTION: BY THE EDITOR. Recitation with dramatic energy by men whose business it was to travel from one great house to another and delight the people by the way, was usual among us from the first. The scop invented and the glee-man recited heroic legends and other tales to our Anglo-Saxon forefathers. These were followed by the minstrels and other tellers of tales written for the people. They frequented fairs and merrymakings, spreading the knowledge not only of tal...

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