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The Tragedies of the Medici

By: Edgcumbe Staley

Preface: When Alexandre Dumas wrote his Crimes of the Borgias?and other ?Crimes??he fully intended to compile a companion volume, treating of episodes in the great family of the Medici. With this project in view, he collected much material, and actually published, tentatively, two interesting brochures: Une Annee a Florence?in 1841, and Les Galeries de Florence?in 1842.

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Sheba

By: Prophet Muhammad

034.001 Praise be to Allah, unto Whom belongeth whatsoever is in the heavens and whatsoever is in the earth. His is the praise in the Hereafter, and He is the Wise, the Aware. 034.002 He knoweth that which goeth into the earth and that which cometh forth from it, and that descendeth from the heaven and that which ascendeth into it. He is the Merciful, the Forgiving. 034.003 Those who disbelieve say: The Hour will never come unto us. Say: Nay, by my Lord, but it is coming...

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A Day in Old Athens

By: William Stearns Davis

Preface: This little book tries to describe what an intelligent person would see and hear in ancient Athens, if by some legerdemain he were translated to the fourth century B.C. and conducted about the city under competent guidance. Rare happenings have been omitted and sometimes, to avoid long explanations, PROBABLE matters have been stated as if they were ascertained facts; but these instances are few, and it is hoped no reader will be led into serious error.

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Verses and Translations

By: C. S. Calverley

She was a phantom, / In lone Glenartney's thickets lies couched the lordly stag, / The dreaming terrier's tail forgets its customary wag; / And plodding ploughmen's weary steps insensibly grow quicker, / As broadening casements light them on towards home, or home-brewed / liquor.

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The Devil's Disciple : A Melodrama in Three Acts

By: George Bernard Shaw

On the 15th June 1903, in the early forenoon, a medical student, surname Redpenny, Christian name unknown and of no importance, sits at work in a doctor's consulting-room. He devils for the doctor by answering his letters, acting as his domestic laboratory assistant, and making himself indispensable generally, in return for unspecified advantages involved by intimate intercourse with a leader of his profession, and amounting to an informal apprenticeship and a temporary ...

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Through Russia

By: Maxim Gorky

Also, the season being autumn, leaves of wild laurel were glistening and gyrating on the white foam of the Kodor like a quantity of mercurial salmon fry. And as I sat on some rocks overlooking the river there occurred to me the thought that, as likely as not, the cause of the gulls' and cormorants' fretful cries where the surf lay moaning behind a belt of trees to the right was that, like myself, they kept mistaking the leaves for fish, and as often finding themselves di...

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History of the Reign of Ferdinand and Isabella V1

By: William H. Prescott

Preface: English writers have done more for the illustration of Spanish history, than for that of any other except their own. To say nothing of the recent general compendium, executed for the ?Cabinet Cyclopaedia,? a work of singular acuteness and information, we have particular narratives of the several reigns, in an unbroken series, from the emperor Charles the Fifth (the First of Spain) to Charles the Third, at the close of the last century, by authors whose names are...

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The Golden Honeymoon

By: Ring W. Lardner

Excerpt: MOTHER says that when I start talking I never know when to stop. But I tell her the only time I get a chance is when she ain't around, so I have to make the most of it. I guess the fact is neither one of us would be welcome in a Quaker meeting, but as I tell Mother, what did God give us tongues for if He didn?t want we should use them? Only she says He didn?t give them to us to say the same thing over and over again, like I do, and repeat myself. But I say: Well...

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Away in the Wilderness; Red Indians and für Traders of N. America

By: R.M. Ballantyne

Excerpt: CHAPTER ONE. The HUNTER. On a beautiful summer evening, not many years ago, a man was seen to ascend the side of a little mound or hillock, on the top of which he lingered to gaze upon the wild scenery that lay stretched out before him. The man wore the leathern coat and leggings of a North American hunter, or trapper, or backwoodsman; and well did he deserve all these titles, for Jasper Derry was known to his friends as the best hunter, the most successful trap...

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The Flayed Hand

By: Guy de Maupassant

One evening about eight months ago I met with some college comrades at the lodgings of our friend Louis R. We drank punch and smoked, talked of literature and art, and made jokes like any other company of young men. Suddenly the door flew open, and one who had been my friend since boyhood burst in like a hurricane. Guess where I come from? he cried. I bet on the Mabille, responded one. No, said another, you are too gay; you come from borrowing money, from burying a rich ...

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The Heir of Redclyffe

By: Charlotte M. Younge

The drawing-room of Hollywell House was one of the favoured apartments, where a peculiar air of home seems to reside, whether seen in the middle of summer, all its large windows open to the garden, or, as when our story commences, its bright fire and stands of fragrant green-house plants contrasted with the wintry fog and leafless trees of November. There were two persons in the room -- a young lady, who sat drawing at the round table, and a youth, lying on a couch near ...

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Les Heures Claires

By: Emile Verhaeren

Excerpt: O la splendeur de notre joie, Tissee en or dans l'air de soie! Voici la maison douce et son pignon leger, Et le jardin et le verger. Voici le banc, sous les pommiers D'ou s'effeuille le printemps blanc, A petales frolants et lents. Voici des vols de lumineux ramiers Planant, ainsi que des presages, Dans le ciel clair du paysage.

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Beyond

By: John Galsworthy

Excerpt: Part 1. I At the door of St. George?s registry office, Charles Clare Winton strolled forward in the wake of the taxi?cab that was bearing his daughter away with ?the fiddler fellow? she had married. His sense of decorum forbade his walking with Nurse Betty ? the only other witness of the wedding. A stout woman in a highly emotional condition would have been an incongruous companion to his slim, upright figure, moving with just that unexaggerated swing and balanc...

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The Life of Timon of Athens

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: Mer. O pray let?s see't. For the Lord Timon, sir? Iewel. If he will touch the estimate. But for that? Poet. When we for recompence haue prais?d the vild, It staines the glory in that happy Verse, Which aptly sings the good ?

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Polly of Pebbly Pit

By: Lillian Elizabeth Roy

Excerpt: Chapter 1. THE FARM IN PEBBLY PIT. ?Polly! Poll?ee!? sounded musically from the direction of the kitchen doorway in a ranch?house, and reached Polly Brewster as she knelt beside her pet in the barn. ?Run outside and see what Maw wants, Poll,? said Mr. Brewster, who was working faithfully over the object of Polly?s solicitous devotion. Obediently, Polly ran out and shaded her eyes as she gazed across the great depression of the volcanic crater which had made such...

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The Autobiography of Christopher Kirkland, Volume 2

By: E. Lynn Linton

I WILL go on with my general reminiscences of persons, not keeping strictly to chronology. I became as a child of the house in the family of Captain Maconochie, that great and good inventor of the Mark System. He had then just returned from Norfolk Island—the penal settlement of the penal settlements; the lower deep of the lowest depths; that veritable hell upon earth which he had made human and possible. He had been deprived of his governorship by those at home who thou...

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Dione

By: John Gay

ACT I. SCENE I. A plain at the foot of a steep craggy mountain. DIONE. LAURA. Laura. Why dost thou fly me? stay, unhappy fair, Seek not these horrid caverns of despair; To trace thy steps the midnight air I bore, Trod the brown desart, and unshelter'd moor: Three times the lark has sung his matin lay, And rose on dewy wing to meet the day, Since first I found thee, stretch'd in pensive mood, Where laurels border Ladon's silver flood. Dione.

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The Passing of Cockeye Blacklock

By: Frank Norris

WELL, m' son, observed Bunt about half an hour after supper, if your provender has shook down comfortable by now, we might as well jar loose and be moving along out yonder. We left the fire and moved toward the hobbled ponies, Bunt complaining of the quality of the outfit's meals. Down in the Panamint country, he growled, we had a Chink that was a sure frying-pan expert; but this Dago -- my word! That ain't victuals, that supper. That's just a' ingenious device for remov...

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The Awkward Age

By: Henry James

Introduction: The age of Elizabeth, memorable for so many reasons in the history of England, was especially brilliant in literature, and, within literature, in the drama. With some falling off in spontaneity, the impulse to great dramatic production lasted till the Long Parliament closed the theaters in 1642; and when they were reopened at the Restoration, in 1660, the stage only too faithfully reflected the debased moral tone of the court society of Charles II.

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The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb, Volume 2

By: Charles Lamb

Introduction: This volume contains the work by which Charles Lamb is best known and upon which his fame will rest?Elia and The Last Essays of Elia. Although one essay is as early as 1811, and one is perhaps as late as 1832, the book represents the period between 1820 and 1826, when Lamb was between forty?five and fifty?one. This was the richest period of his literary life.

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